How long before you can walk normally after bunion surgery?

How long should you stay off your feet after bunion surgery?

For the first few days after surgery, you should keep your foot elevated and applying ice as your doctor recommends. You should keep your foot dry and stay off your feet for 3 to 5 days after your surgery. You should use a walker, cane, knee scooter or crutches to get around.

What happens if you walk too soon after bunion surgery?

In MacGill’s clinical experience, patients who put weight on the foot too early can increase postoperative pain and swelling, as well as risk loss of correction and possible delayed bone healing, he said.

How long after bunion surgery can I walk?

Patients can immediately walk in a walking boot and will stay on for two weeks. Patients will transition to sneakers and sandals but heels will not be worn for another four weeks. In a sense, you can add 2 weeks to every 2 inch heels you would want to wear after you have transitioned into sneakers.

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What is the fastest way to recover from bunion surgery?

Bunion Surgery Recovery Tips

  1. Buy ice packs to prevent leaking onto bandage from using plastic bags.
  2. Cook a few days worth of meals before surgery.
  3. Have extra pillows for easy elevation of the leg.
  4. Practice with crutches if you will be using them.
  5. Buy compressive wrap to help decrease swelling after surgery.

Can I take my boot off to sleep after bunion surgery?

You will receive a soft bunion splint that you should use 23 hours a day. If comfortable, you can sleep only with the splint, and without the shoe.

Why does my foot still hurt after bunion surgery?

This pain is usually with activity and can be burning, aching or throbbing. Sometimes there is swelling there as well. This type of pain is called ‘transfer metatarsalgia’; this basically means that the pain was simply moved from the bunion to the area under the ball of the foot; pain remains, even after surgery.

What happens at 6 weeks after bunion surgery?

You will have pain and swelling that slowly improves in the 6 weeks after surgery. You may have some minor pain and swelling that lasts as long as 6 months to a year. After surgery, you will need to wear a cast or a special type of shoe to protect your toe and to keep it in the right position for at least 3 to 6 weeks.

When can I walk without crutches after bunion surgery?

By six weeks, your bones should be set in place, but this can take longer if you have underlying medical conditions or if you smoke. If you notice signs of infection, or if your surgical wound isn’t healing well, you could be trying to walk again too soon.

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Do screws stay in after bunion surgery?

The screw head is approx 2-3mm above the bone, so that small area can create swelling and discomfort to the top of the foot. Furthermore, extremely active patients can force that screw to work its way up out of the bone. The screw does not have to be removed, unless it causes discomfort.

Does your shoe size change after bunion surgery?

Realistic Expectations About Bunion Surgery

The vast majority of patients who undergo bunion surgery experience a dramatic reduction of foot pain after surgery, along with a significant improvement in the alignment of their big toe. Bunion surgery will not allow you to wear a smaller shoe size or narrow-pointed shoes.

How long after bunion surgery can I wear normal shoes?

Most commonly, you would not be allowed to walk fully on the foot for two to six weeks. Most people are able to start wearing a regular shoe approximately two months after surgery as it takes time for the swelling to resolve.

What happens at 4 weeks post op Bunionectomy?

Week 4: During this week the patient it’s a little more freedom and is usually able to go to the store for short periods of time and gradually increase the time on the foot. Physical therapy should be continued during this time to decrease swelling and preserve range of motion.